Oceanography News

Courtesy of Science Daily

Welcome to Sea and Sky's Oceanography News. Here you can find links to the latest ocean news headlines in the topic of oceanography. Click on any yellow title below to view the full news article. The news article will open in a new browser window. Simply close the browser window when you are finished reading the article to return to the news article listing. You can use the "Click for More" link to go to a page with more news headlines.

 

Our oceans are suffering, but we can rebuild marine life
It's not too late to rescue global marine life, according to a study outlining the steps needed for marine ecosystems to recover from damage by 2050. The study found many components of marine ecosystems could be rebuilt if we try harder to address the causes of their decline.
Publ.Date : Thu, 02 Apr 2020 10:08:58 EDT

Six decades of change in plankton communities
New research shows that some species have experienced a 75% population decrease in the past 60 years, while others are more than twice as abundant due to rises in sea surface temperatures.
Publ.Date : Thu, 02 Apr 2020 10:08:37 EDT

Discovery of life in solid rock deep beneath sea may inspire new search for life on Mars
Newly discovered single-celled creatures living deep beneath the seafloor have provided clues about how to find life on Mars. These bacteria were discovered living in tiny cracks inside volcanic rocks after researchers perfected a new method cutting rocks into ultrathin slices to study under a microscope. Researchers estimate that the rock cracks are home to a community of bacteria as dense as that of the human gut, about 10 billion bacterial cells per cubic centimeter.
Publ.Date : Thu, 02 Apr 2020 08:05:06 EDT

About the distribution of biodiversity on our planet
Large open-water fish predators such as tunas or sharks hunt for prey more intensively in the temperate zone than near the equator. With this result, a study is challenging a long-standing explanation for the distribution of biodiversity on our planet.
Publ.Date : Wed, 01 Apr 2020 13:08:09 EDT

Intensity of past methane release measured with new, groundbreaking methods
A novel approach to geochemical measurements helps scientists reconstruct the past intensity of the methane seeps in the Arctic Ocean. Recent studies show that methane emissions fluctuated, strongly, in response to known periods of abrupt climate change at the end of the last glacial cycle.
Publ.Date : Mon, 30 Mar 2020 09:34:27 EDT

Seafloor of Fram Strait is a sink for microplastic from Arctic and North Atlantic Ocean
Working in the Arctic Fram Strait, scientists have found microplastic throughout the water column with particularly high concentrations at the ocean floor.
Publ.Date : Fri, 27 Mar 2020 14:15:17 EDT

Control of anthropogenic atmospheric emissions can improve water quality in seas
A new research highlighted the importance of reducing fossil fuel combustion not only to curb the trend of global warming, but also to improve the quality of China's coastal waters.
Publ.Date : Fri, 27 Mar 2020 10:30:34 EDT

Researchers document seasonal migration in deep-sea
For the first time, researchers have documented seasonal migrations of fishes across the deep seafloor, revealing an important insight that will further scientific understanding of the nature of our planet.
Publ.Date : Thu, 26 Mar 2020 14:44:13 EDT

How stable is deep ocean circulation in warmer climate?
If circulation of deep waters in the Atlantic stops or slows due to climate change, it could cause cooling in northern North America and Europe - a scenario that has occurred during past cold glacial periods. Now, a new study suggests that short-term disruptions of deep ocean circulation occurred during warm interglacial periods in the last 450,000 years, and may happen again.
Publ.Date : Thu, 26 Mar 2020 14:43:53 EDT

As the ocean warms, marine species relocate toward the poles
Since pre-industrial times, the world's oceans have warmed by an average of one degree Celsius (1°C). Now researchers report that those rising temperatures have led to widespread changes in the population sizes of marine species. The researchers found a general pattern of species having increasing numbers on their poleward sides and losses toward the equator.
Publ.Date : Thu, 26 Mar 2020 12:41:55 EDT

A small forage fish should command greater notice, researchers say
A slender little fish called the sand lance plays a big role as 'a quintessential forage fish' for puffins, terns and other seabirds, humpback whales and other marine mammals, and even bigger fish such as Atlantic sturgeon, cod and bluefin tuna in the Gulf of Maine and northwest Atlantic Ocean. But scientists say right now they know far too little about its biology and populations to inform 'relevant management, climate adaptation and conservation efforts.'
Publ.Date : Wed, 25 Mar 2020 15:41:00 EDT

Eclectic rocks influence earthquake types
New Zealand's largest fault is a jumble of mixed-up rocks of all shapes, sizes, compositions and origins. According to research from a global team of scientists, this motley mixture could help explain why the fault generates slow-motion earthquakes known as 'slow slip events' as well as destructive, tsunami-generating tremors.
Publ.Date : Wed, 25 Mar 2020 15:40:52 EDT

How squid communicate in the dark
Researchers begin to reveal how social squid communicate in the near-blackness of the deep sea.
Publ.Date : Tue, 24 Mar 2020 13:19:28 EDT

East Antarctica's Denman Glacier has retreated almost 3 miles over last 22 years
East Antarctica's Denman Glacier has retreated 5 kilometers, nearly 3 miles, in the past 22 years, and researchers are concerned that the shape of the ground surface beneath the ice sheet could make it even more susceptible to climate-driven collapse.
Publ.Date : Mon, 23 Mar 2020 12:56:27 EDT

Christmas Island discovery redraws map of life
The world's animal distribution map will need to be redrawn and textbooks updated, after researchers discovered the existence of 'Australian' species on Christmas Island. The finding revises the long-held understanding of the location of one of biology and geography's most significant barriers - the Wallace line.
Publ.Date : Mon, 23 Mar 2020 11:20:53 EDT

Hidden source of carbon found at the Arctic coast
A new study has shown evidence of undetected concentrations and flows of dissolved organic matter entering Arctic coastal waters coming from groundwater flows on top of frozen permafrost. This water moves from land to sea unseen, but researchers now believe it carries significant concentrations of carbon and other nutrients to Arctic coastal food webs.
Publ.Date : Sat, 21 Mar 2020 09:32:04 EDT

Sea otters, opossums and the surprising ways pathogens move from land to sea
A parasite known only to be hosted in North America by the Virginia opossum is infecting sea otters along the West Coast. A new study elucidates the sometimes surprising and complex pathways infectious pathogens can move from land to sea to sea otter.
Publ.Date : Thu, 19 Mar 2020 12:52:23 EDT

Microplastics found in a quarter of San Diego estuary fish
Nearly a quarter of fish collected from a San Diego stream contain microplastics. The study, which examined plastics in coastal sediments and three species of fish, showed that the frequency and types of plastic ingested varied with fish species and, in some cases, size or age of fish.
Publ.Date : Wed, 18 Mar 2020 14:37:02 EDT

Greenland shed ice at unprecedented rate in 2019; Antarctica continues to lose mass
Scientists describe Greenland's loss of 600 billion tons of ice in the summer of 2019, raising global sea levels by 2.2 millimeters in a short time.
Publ.Date : Wed, 18 Mar 2020 14:36:30 EDT

Increasingly mobile sea ice risks polluting Arctic neighbors
The movement of sea ice between Arctic countries is expected to significantly increase this century, raising the risk of more widely transporting pollutants like microplastics and oil, according to new research.
Publ.Date : Wed, 18 Mar 2020 14:36:20 EDT