Marine Biology News

Courtesy of Science Daily

Welcome to Sea and Sky's Marine Biology News. Here you can find links to the latest ocean news headlines in the topic of marine biology. Click on any yellow title below to view the full news article. The news article will open in a new browser window. Simply close the browser window when you are finished reading the article to return to the news article listing. You can use the "Click for More" link to go to a page with more news headlines.

 

Blue mussels not yet the bellwether of NE coastal environment
Mussels could be the perfect 'sentinel' species to signal the health of coastal ecosystems. But a new study of blue mussels in estuary ecosystems along 600 kilometers of coastline in the Northeast uncovered three key mysteries that will have to be solved first.
Publ.Date : Fri, 30 Jan 2015 09:29:19 EST

Scientists investigate link between skyrocketing sea slug populations, warming seas
A team of California scientists believes a far-flung Okenia rosacea bloom -- along with a slew of other marine species spotted north of their typical ranges -- may signal a much larger shift in ocean climate and a strong forthcoming El Niño.
Publ.Date : Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:08:54 EST

Baleen whales hear through their bones
Understanding how baleen whales hear has posed a great mystery to marine mammal researchers. Biologists reveal that the skulls of at least some baleen whales, specifically fin whales in their study, have acoustic properties that capture the energy of low frequencies and direct it to their ear bones.
Publ.Date : Thu, 29 Jan 2015 14:30:32 EST

Researchers produce two bio-fuels from a single algae
A common algae commercially grown to make fish food holds promise as a source for both biodiesel and jet fuel, according to a new study.
Publ.Date : Wed, 28 Jan 2015 17:01:59 EST

Smothered oceans: Extreme oxygen loss in oceans accompanied past global climate change
From the subarctic Pacific to the Chilean margins, extreme oxygen loss is stretching from the upper ocean to about 3,000 meters deep. In some oceanic regions, such loss occurred within 100 years or less, according to a new study.
Publ.Date : Wed, 28 Jan 2015 15:21:55 EST

Into the dark: Two new encrusting anemones found in coral reef caves
Three marine biologists from Japan have discovered two new and unusually unique species of encrusting anemone. Unlike almost all known species within their genus, these two new species do not have light-harvesting symbiotic zooxanthellae, having lost them as they adapted to life in cracks and caves in shallow coral reefs.
Publ.Date : Wed, 28 Jan 2015 09:35:42 EST

Ocean acidification changes balance of biofouling communities
A new study of marine organisms that make up the 'biofouling community' -- tiny creatures that attach themselves to ships' hulls and rocks in the ocean around the world -- shows how they adapt to changing ocean acidification. Authors examine how these communities may respond to future change.
Publ.Date : Wed, 28 Jan 2015 08:22:43 EST

Climate change redistributes fish species at high latitudes
For millions of years, large parts of the marine biotas of the North Atlantic and North Pacific have been separated by harsh climate conditions in the Arctic. A new study underlines that climate change has begun to weaken this natural barrier promoting the interchange of fishes between the two oceans along with many ecological and economic consequences.
Publ.Date : Tue, 27 Jan 2015 18:41:59 EST

Fish catch break on world stage at global conference
Freshwater fish provide the food, sport and economic power across the globe. Inland fishing is often about individuals, families and small cooperatives. More than 60 million people in low-income nations are estimated to rely on inland fisheries for their livelihood. Its small-but-many base has in modern times across the globe been shy of strong data to document its impact. That has left the inland fishery industry a poor competitor for water against agriculture, energy, commercial development and industry.
Publ.Date : Tue, 27 Jan 2015 12:24:51 EST

Cause for decline of Missouri River pallid sturgeon identified
Oxygen-depleted dead zones between dams in the upper Missouri River have been directly linked with the failure of endangered pallid sturgeon embryos to survive, according to a study. The study is the first to make a direct link among dam-induced changes in riverine sediment transport, the subsequent effects of those changes on reduced oxygen levels and the survival of an endangered species, the pallid sturgeon.
Publ.Date : Mon, 26 Jan 2015 09:59:41 EST

Warming seas decrease sea turtle basking
Green sea turtles may stop basking on beaches around the world within a century due to rising sea temperatures, a new study suggests. Basking helps the turtles regulate body temperature and may aid their immune system and digestion. By analyzing six years of turtle surveys and 24 years of satellite data, researchers have found the turtles bask more often when sea surface temperatures are lower. This vital behavior may cease globally by 2102 if global warming trends continue.
Publ.Date : Fri, 23 Jan 2015 10:22:17 EST

Sisters act together: Cichlid sisters swim together in order to reach the goal
The manner and routes of dispersal vary with the species and the ecological conditions. Many fish form shoals to avoid predation. Shoaling with familiar conspecifics affords the fish an even greater advantage by increasing the benefit for relatives. This promotes the continuation and future spread of an individual's own genetic information, scientists report.
Publ.Date : Fri, 23 Jan 2015 08:17:15 EST

These jellyfish aren't just drifters; many swim strongly
Jellyfish might look like mere drifters, but some of them have a remarkable ability to detect the direction of ocean currents and to swim strongly against them, according to new evidence in free-ranging barrel-jellyfish.
Publ.Date : Thu, 22 Jan 2015 13:31:17 EST

Using less fish to test chemicals safety
A new strategy has been proposed on how to replace, reduce and refine the use of fish in testing of chemicals’ effect on flora and fauna in water (aquatic toxicity) and chemicals’ uptake and concentration in living organisms (bioaccumulation). Out of the 11.5 million animals used for experimental purposes in the EU (2011 data), cold blooded animals, namely reptiles, amphibians and fish represent 12.4%. In the case of specific testing for toxicological safety assessment, fish represent 18% of the one million animals used.
Publ.Date : Thu, 22 Jan 2015 13:30:26 EST

Study projects unprecedented loss of corals in Great Barrier Reef due to warming
The coverage of living corals on Australia's Great Barrier Reef could decline to less than 10 percent if ocean warming continues, according to a new study that explores the short- and long-term consequences of environmental changes to the reef.
Publ.Date : Thu, 22 Jan 2015 10:32:42 EST

Small drop in sea level had big impact on southern Great Barrier Reef
A small drop in sea level 2000 years ago on the southern Greater Barrier Reef led to a dramatic slowdown in the coral reef's growth, research shows. The researchers analyzed samples from One Tree Reef in the southern Great Barrier Reef. They radiocarbon dated sediment cores from the lagoons of the coral reef to calculate sand infilling. Sea level change was calculated by dating fossil samples from micro-atolls.
Publ.Date : Thu, 22 Jan 2015 10:32:36 EST

One fish, two fish: Camera counts freshwater fish, which could help combat hydrilla
The study of a graduate student includes the draining of ponds to verify fish counted on video. This leads to findings that can help fisheries managers control the invasive hydrilla.
Publ.Date : Thu, 22 Jan 2015 09:22:14 EST

Drillers help make new Antarctic discoveries
An expedition to Antarctica yields new information about how climate change affects Antarctic glaciers. The study has discovered a new ecosystem, researchers report, including a unique ecosystem of fish and invertebrates living in an estuary deep beneath the Antarctic ice.
Publ.Date : Wed, 21 Jan 2015 14:48:44 EST

Climate change threatens 30 years of sea turtle conservation success
A new study is sounding the alarm about climate change and its potential impact on more than 30 years of conservation efforts to keep sea turtles around for the next generation. Climate change is causing sea-level rise, and how coastal communities react to that rise could have dire consequences for sea turtles and other wildlife that rely on an unobstructed beach for survival, researchers say.
Publ.Date : Wed, 21 Jan 2015 10:32:32 EST

Simple soil mixture reverses toxic stormwater effects
A simple column of common soil can reverse the toxic effects of urban runoff that otherwise quickly kills young coho salmon and their insect prey, according to new research. The affordable and remarkably effective treatment offers new promise for controlling toxic pollutants that collect on paved surfaces and wash off as stormwater into rivers, streams and the ocean.
Publ.Date : Tue, 20 Jan 2015 18:59:56 EST