Marine Biology News

Courtesy of Science Daily

Welcome to Sea and Sky's Marine Biology News. Here you can find links to the latest ocean news headlines in the topic of marine biology. Click on any yellow title below to view the full news article. The news article will open in a new browser window. Simply close the browser window when you are finished reading the article to return to the news article listing. You can use the "Click for More" link to go to a page with more news headlines.

 

Reef-builders with a sense of harmony
Cold-water corals of the species Lophelia pertusa are able to fuse skeletons of genetically distinct individuals. Scientists have made the first-ever discovery of branches of different colors that had flawlessly merged. The ability to fuse supports the reef stability and thus contributes to the success of corals as reef-builders of the deep sea.
Publ.Date : Thu, 30 Oct 2014 10:28:52 EDT

Plump turtles swim better: First models of swimming animals
Bigger is better, if you're a leatherback sea turtle. For the first time, researchers have measured the forces that act on a swimming animal and the energy the animal must expend to move through the water.
Publ.Date : Wed, 29 Oct 2014 20:37:51 EDT

The secret life of the sea trout
Sea trout, also known as brown trout, live complicated lives. Like salmon, they begin their lives in a river, hatched from eggs that were laid in small nests, called redds. As the young fish mature, they go through several developmental stages, all of which involve substantial physiological changes. The most important stage from this perspective is when the fish becomes a smolt, after about 2 years. Entering the smolt stage is like being given a passport out to the sea, because the physiological changes allow the fish to tolerate salt water.
Publ.Date : Wed, 29 Oct 2014 08:36:23 EDT

Penguin chick weights connected to local weather conditions
Oceanographers have reported a connection between local weather conditions and the weight of Adélie penguin chicks. Adélie penguins are an indigenous species of the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP), one of the most rapidly warming areas on Earth. Since 1950, the average annual temperature in the Antarctic Peninsula has increased 2 degrees Celsius on average, and 6 degrees Celsius during winter.
Publ.Date : Mon, 27 Oct 2014 14:46:28 EDT

Law of the Sea authorizes animal tagging research without nations' consent, experts say
Scientists who study migratory marine animals can rarely predict where the animals' paths will lead. Researchers now argue that coastal nations don't have precedent under the law of the sea to require scientists to seek advance permission to remotely track tagged animals who may enter their waters. Requiring advance consent undermines the goals of the law, which is meant to encourage scientific research for conservation of marine animals.
Publ.Date : Sat, 25 Oct 2014 15:27:11 EDT

Climate change impacts countered by stricter fisheries management
A new study has found that implementing stricter fisheries management overcame the expected detrimental effects of climate change disturbances in coral reef fisheries badly impacted by the 1997/98 El Niño.
Publ.Date : Fri, 24 Oct 2014 12:45:57 EDT

Decrease of genetic diversity in the endangered Saimaa ringed seal continues
The critically endangered Saimaa ringed seal, which inhabits Lake Saimaa in Finland, has extremely low genetic diversity and this development seems to continue, according to a recent study. Researchers analyzed the temporal and regional variation in the genetic diversity of the endangered Saimaa ringed seal. The population is only around 300 individuals divided into smaller sub-populations and with very little migration among between them.
Publ.Date : Fri, 24 Oct 2014 10:12:52 EDT

Bodies at sea: Ocean oxygen levels may impact scavenger response
An ocean's oxygen levels may play a role in the impact of marine predators on bodies when they are immersed in the sea, according to researchers, who deployed a trio of pig carcasses into Saanich Inlet off Vancouver Island and studied them using an underwater camera via the internet.
Publ.Date : Thu, 23 Oct 2014 15:50:26 EDT

Top marine scientists call for action on 'invisible' fisheries
To protect our oceans from irreversible harm, governments, conservationists, and researchers around the world must address the enormous threat posed by unregulated and destructive fisheries, say top marine scientists.
Publ.Date : Thu, 23 Oct 2014 14:21:18 EDT

Arrested development: Sediment wreaks havoc with fish larvae
Sediments associated with dredging and flood plumes could have a significant impact on fish populations by extending the time required for the development of their larvae, according to researchers.
Publ.Date : Thu, 23 Oct 2014 10:10:09 EDT

Sea turtles' first days of life: Sprint and ride towards safety
With new nano-sized acoustic transmitters, scientists followed the pathways of loggerhead turtle hatchlings. According to the study, local oceanic conditions are believed to drive the evolution of some unique swimming behaviors.
Publ.Date : Thu, 23 Oct 2014 10:07:43 EDT

Study of mitochondrial DNA reveals how loggerhead turtle reached Mediterranean
To date, it was thought that the loggerhead turtle arrived to the Mediterranean from North America and the Caribbean after the last glacial period. However, latest scientific studies show that this marine species colonized the Mediterranean between 20,000 and 200,000 years ago, so the colonization event took place before the last glacial period.
Publ.Date : Thu, 23 Oct 2014 09:10:09 EDT

BOFFFFs (big, old, fat, fertile, female fish) sustain fisheries
A new compilation of research from around the world now shows that big, old, fat, fertile, female fish -- known as BOFFFFs to scientists -- are essential for ensuring that fishery stocks remain sustainable.
Publ.Date : Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:16:12 EDT

Ocean's living carbon pumps: When viruses attack giant algal blooms, global carbon cycles are affected
By some estimates, almost half of the world's organic carbon is fixed by marine organisms called phytoplankton -- single-celled photosynthetic organisms that account for less than one percent of the total photosynthetic biomass on Earth. When giant algal blooms get viral infections, global carbon cycles are affected, scientists have now discovered.
Publ.Date : Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:15:10 EDT

Fish tale: New study evaluates antibiotic content in farm-raised fish
Antibiotic use in the rapidly expanding world of global aquaculture has been examined in a new study. Results of the research evaluated the presence of antibiotics in shrimp, salmon, catfish, trout, tilapia and swai, originating from 11 countries. Data showed traces of 5 of the 47 antibiotics evaluated.
Publ.Date : Mon, 20 Oct 2014 13:49:08 EDT

Breathing sand: New measurement technique detects oxygen supply to bottom of North Sea
New analytical methods show for the first time, how the permeable, sandy sediment at the bottom of the North Sea is supplied with oxygen and which factors determine the exchange. Based on the detailed investigation and new measurement technology, the turnover of organic matter and nutrients at the sea floor as well as future changes within the dynamic ecosystem can be better assessed.
Publ.Date : Mon, 20 Oct 2014 10:53:29 EDT

Plastic nanoparticles also harm freshwater organisms
Organisms can be negatively affected by plastic nanoparticles, not just in the seas and oceans but in freshwater bodies too. These particles slow the growth of algae, cause deformities in water fleas and impede communication between small organisms and fish.
Publ.Date : Fri, 17 Oct 2014 09:29:16 EDT

Impact of offshore wind farms on marine species
Offshore wind power is a valuable source of renewable energy that can help reduce carbon emissions. Technological advances are allowing higher capacity turbines to be installed in deeper water, but there is still much unknown about the effects on the environment. Scientists have now reviewed the potential impacts of offshore wind developments on marine species and make recommendations for future monitoring and assessment as interest in offshore wind energy grows around the world.
Publ.Date : Thu, 16 Oct 2014 12:36:08 EDT

Turning humble seaweed into biofuel
The sea has long been a source of Norway’s riches, whether from cod, farmed salmon or oil. Now one researcher hopes to add seaweed to this list as he refines a way to produce “biocrude” from common kelp. "What we are trying to do is to mimic natural processes to produce oil," he said. "However, while petroleum oil is produced naturally on a geologic time scale, we can do it in minutes."
Publ.Date : Thu, 16 Oct 2014 08:56:50 EDT

Microfossils reveal warm oceans had less oxygen
Researchers are pairing chemical analyses with micropaleontology -- the study of tiny fossilized organisms -- to better understand how global marine life was affected by a rapid warming event more than 55 million years ago. Their findings are the subject of an article in the journal Paleoceanography.
Publ.Date : Wed, 15 Oct 2014 16:56:07 EDT