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October Constellations

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The seven October constellations include such well-known formations as Aquarius, the water bearer, and Pegasus, the winged horse. The only notable deep sky objects are located in these two constellations. Aquarius contains two globular clusters and one open cluster. Pegasus is home to a single globular star cluster. The remaining constellations of October are relatively unremarkable, composed mainly of faint stars with no deep sky objects worthy of mention. The only bright stars worth mentioning are Alnair, in Grus, and Fomalhaut, in Piscis Austrinus.

Aquarius | Cepheus | Grus | Lacerta | Octans | Pegasus | Piscis Austrinus

  Aquarius The Water Bearer  

Pronunciation:  (uh-KWER-ee-us) 
Abbreviation:  Aqr   Genitive:  Aquarii
Right Ascension:  22.71 hours   Declination:  -10.19 degrees
Area in Square Degrees: 
980
Crosses Meridian:  9 PM, October 10

Aquarius is visible in the fall in the northern hemisphere and spring in the southern hemisphere. It is represented as a man pouring water from a bucket. This ancient constellation has its roots in many a number of cultures. In Greek mythology, Aquarius was Ganymede, the cupbearer to the gods. 

Points of Interest in Aquarius
Diagram of the constellation Aquarius Object Name Type/Translation V Mag
1 M2 Globular Star Cluster 6.5
2 M73 Open Star Cluster 2.8
3 M72 Globular Star Cluster 9.3
4 Sadalmelik Lucky Star of the King 2.96
5 Sadalsuud Luck of Lucks 2.91
6 Sadalachbia Lucky Star of the Tents 3.84
7 Skat Leg 3.27
8 Albali The Drinker 3.77
9 Ancha Hip Bone 4.16
10 Situla * 5.03
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  Cepheus The King  

Pronunciation:  (SEE-fee-us) 
Abbreviation:  Cep   Genitive:  Cephei
Right Ascension:  22.52 hours   Declination:  71.59 degrees
Area in Square Degrees: 
588
Crosses Meridian:  9 PM, October 15

Cepheus, the King, is visible all year in the northern hemisphere. It was named after the king of Ethiopia. Cepheus was the husband of Cassiopeia and the father of Andromeda.

Points of Interest in Cepheus
Diagram of the constellation Cepheus Object Name Type/Translation V Mag
1 Alderamin Right Forearm 2.44
2 Alfirk Flock 3.23
3 Alrai Shepherd 3.21
4 Herschel's Garnet Star * 4.08
5 Alkurhah * 4.29
6 Al Kalb al Rai * 5.50
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  Grus The Crane  

Pronunciation:  (GRUS
Abbreviation:  Gru   Genitive:  Gruis
Right Ascension:  22.61 hours   Declination:  -44.52 degrees
Area in Square Degrees: 
366
Crosses Meridian:  9 PM, October 10

Grus, the Crane, is visible in latitudes south of 33 degrees north from July through September. It was named by Johann Bayer and represents the crane, which was the symbol for the office of astronomer in ancient Egypt.

Points of Interest in Grus
Diagram of the constellation Grus Object Name Type/Translation V Mag
1 Alnair The Bright 1.74
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  Lacerta The Lizard  

Pronunciation:  (luh-SER-tuh) 
Abbreviation:  Lac   Genitive:  Lacertae
Right Ascension:  22.46 hours   Declination:  44.82 degrees
Area in Square Degrees:  201
Crosses Meridian:  9 PM, October 10

Lacerta extends from the head of Cepheus to the foot of Perseus, between Cygnus and Andromeda. It is one of seven constellations created by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. 

Points of Interest in Lacerta
Diagram of the constellation Lacerta
None.

This constellation is composed mostly of faint stars.

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  Octans The Octant  

Pronunciation:  (OK-tanz) 
Abbreviation:  Oct   Genitive:  Octantis
Right Ascension:  21.31 hours   Declination:  -83.76 degrees
Area in Square Degrees: 
291
Crosses Meridian:  9 PM, September 20

Octans, the Octant, is visible in latitudes south of the equator. It is a circumpolar and is visible all night long. Octans contains the South Celestial Pole. It is named after the octant, a navigational tool used to locate Polaris, the North Star. 

Points of Interest in Octans
Diagram of the constellation Octans Object Name Type/Translation V Mag
1 Polaris Australis Southern Pole 5.47
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  Pegasus The Winged Horse  

Pronunciation:  (PEG-uh-sus) 
Abbreviation:  Peg   Genitive:  Pegasi
Right Ascension:  22.75 hours   Declination:  19.53 degrees
Area in Square Degrees:  1121
Crosses Meridian:  9 PM, October 20

Pegasus is visible from August through December. It represents the son of Neptune and Medusa who eventually became the thundering horse of Zeus and the carrier of his lightning bolts.

Points of Interest in Pegasus
Diagram of the constellation Pegasus Object Name Type/Translation V Mag
1 M45 Globular Star Cluster 1.6
2 Markab The Thing for Riding On 2.49
3 Scheat Leg 2.42
4 Algenib Flank 2.83
5 Enif Nose 2.39
6 Homam The High-minded Man 3.40
7 Matar Rain 2.94
8 Baham Livestock 3.53
9 Salm * 4.6
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  Piscis Austrinus The Southern Fish  

Pronunciation:  (PY-sis ahs-TRY-nus) 
Abbreviation:  PsA   Genitive:  Piscis Austrini
Right Ascension:  22.29 hours   Declination:  -30.66 degrees
Area in Square Degrees:  245
Crosses Meridian:  9 PM, October 10

Piscis Austrinus, the Southern Fish, is  visible in latitudes south of 53 degrees north from July through September. This is an ancient constellation that may have been the original Pisces. It is represented as a fish lying on its back drinking the waters pouring from the jar of Aquarius.

Points of Interest in Piscis Austrinus
Diagram of the constellation Piscis Austrinus Object Name Type/Translation V Mag
1 Fomalhaut Mouth of the Fish 1.16
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